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Why people don't go to church

As a pastor, one of the consuming questions with which I wrestle is “Why don’t people go to church?” In particular, the question is “Why don’t people come to my church?” If you doubt that people are opinionated, ask this question to a group of church people on a Wednesday night. I’ve studied church growth for several years, and I have a number of opinions about the matter myself. But, I wonder if we are asking the right question to the wrong people.

Several researchers in the last few years have begun asking people who don’t attend church why they don’t attend church, and the answers are interesting. George Barna asked this question and provided the answers in his book, Grow Your Church from the Outside In. The top five reasons that people gave for not attending church comprise 83% of the reasons why people don’t come to church.

1. No time; schedule conflicts; working 26%
2. Not interested; nothing to offer; no reason 16%
3. Don’t know 15%
4. My beliefs are different than the church’s 14%
5. Don’t believe in organized religion/
Don’t need to worship at a church 12%

1. No time. Churches can offer alternatives for working people, and we should do so to the extent that our resources allow. For the majority of people who gave/give this answer, I think it is a poor excuse. It seems to me that most of us do what we want to do. I know that I do. I make time for the things that are important to me. Sometimes I say that I don’t have time when I really mean I have time, but not for whatever it is you are asking me to do. I think that most of the people who gave this answer really mean #2, but they were just trying to be polite.

2. Not interested. This answer is the answer that keeps me up at night. Why aren’t people interested in church? I believe that the answers to this question are the keys for the church reaching the unchurched in our communities. Jesus is the most exciting person who has ever graced this earth. How could anyone not be interested in Jesus? Perhaps the problem is that people aren’t finding Jesus in church.

3. Don’t know. Fifteen percent of all people surveyed said that they don’t know why they don’t attend church. It sounds to me like these people just might come if we invite them to do so. They don’t really have a reason not to come.

4. Different beliefs. The beliefs of a church are non-negotiable. But, I wonder how many of the people who gave this answer really know what the church believes. Perhaps people know what we are against, but do they know what we are for? Most churches are “for” some pretty awesome stuff.

5. Don’t need organized religion/can worship anywhere. I believe that many people who give this answer are only fooling themselves. From a theological perspective we need each other. It is impossible to accomplish the will of God for our lives in isolation. God calls us to lead others to faith in Him and to teach others how to follow Him as we do so ourselves. How can we possibly do these things without some type of organization? The problem stems from a “me” mentality, but worship is not about me.

Sadly, some people are in the ranks of those who don't attend church because they have experienced great pain in a local church. We are sometimes brutal when it comes to our own people. I speak from personal experience. I have wounded others. If you are in these ranks because of past pain, you have my sympathy. Will you try to trust again? You may find more than you ever imagined at the feet of Jesus.

Comments

James said…
Just a quick comment on one point you raised, "Why aren't people interested in church?"

You state that Christ is the most exciting person to ever grace this earth, and that perhaps people are not finding Jesus in our churches.

May I offer two other options?

1) Christ is so "watered down" in some churches that believeing in him or not believing, or maybe, sort of, kind of, possibly believing is OK too. Not much to be excited about there...

2)Christ's compassion and love for this world is the secondary message. Primary emphasis is on which denomination has got it all together, which political view is most aligned with conservative Christian values, who should do what, say what, wear what....well you get the picture.

In one case people belong to nothing or no one (Church or Jesus Christ) in the other scenario the church does a good job of reviving the role of Pharisees (seems I read a blog on that once)

Anyway, that's my view from the back pew!
Anonymous said…
Some people don't go to church 'cause there's too much negative drama there, especially between the leaders & it's difficult to see Jesus in all their mess. People trust Jesus but not the leaders and people in the church who hurt them.
Clara said…
People know when someting is wrong, they go to the doctor/hosptal. We need to reflect to those who don't go to church that it is not a house of rules, but of healing and hope. We have the answer -- let's be happy about it!

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