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The Reaper

Last night as I was channel surfing I watched part of a new show called the Reaper. I don’t usually get into sci-fi (well not since Quantum Leap), but this sitcom was mildly entertaining. The main character, Sam (Bret Harrison), was having a conversation with the Devil (Ray Wise), and the Devil was really upset. It was the evening before Halloween, and to Sam’s surprise the Devil said that Halloween was the worst day of the year for him. The Devil said that it was “the commercialization of evil.” He said that no one was afraid of him and that it was just all fun and games now.

I couldn’t help but laugh at the wisdom behind the comedy. Halloween has become a fun time for many kids. At Oakland we are planning to give out lots of candy tonight. As I drove onto our campus this morning, I had a momentary rush of excitement as I thought about thousands of kids in Roanoke flooding the streets (and coming to our event) as Power Rangers and Princesses. I can’t help but think that tonight is going to be lots of fun. Too bad I don’t have my Superman outfit anymore!

Comments

James said…
Was excited to hear how many kids you guys had.

The streets of Jeff were pretty empty. Not sure why. Even the trunk or treat we went to was lightly attended.

I wish my kids could experience the Halloweens I did. Kids everywhere, every house handing out candy. Oh well, some much wishing.

Looking for something smart to say about your Superman costume, only thing I can think is you're a bit old to run around in tights aren't you. Having we had that discussion at a couple of races???
21k said…
The event turned out really well. Including adults we had around 300 people. We had so many people that we ran out of candy!
21k said…
I think that I am more suited for a Clark Kent costume these days.

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