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Thanksgiving

Oh give thanks to the LORD, for he is good; for his steadfast love endures forever! Psalm 118.1 (ESV)

Thanksgiving has been a theme for believers in every generation and in every culture. This refrain occurs numerous times in the Bible by different writers over several centuries. Two reasons are given in this verse to be thankful. The first reason is the goodness of God. The second reason is the steadfast love of God.

The goodness of God is at the heart of our understanding of who God is. The first temptation in the Garden of Eden was to doubt the goodness of God. The Serpent essentially asked Eve if God really cared about her. Does God really care for you? Is God really for you? If God is good, then why are you being denied something? You have the right to what you want.

What is your response to God? Is God good? How has He proven Himself to you?

I was asked recently if there was a special word in Scripture for steadfast. In the original language the first word of this verse is a word that means loyal love or unfailing love.  It refers to God’s covenant love for us and is a love that lasts through every trial throughout all of time. David uses this word here to praise God for His protection and care. Many people have failed David. David has failed God and others. But God never fails.

Have you experienced the unfailing love of God in your life?

These words were written as a celebration of thanksgiving. May we join the ancient writers in giving thanks?

 

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